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welcome to my messy blog || some changes coming soon (more of my own art/music and stuffs) || environmentalism || human/animal rights || activism/feminism || skate || bmx || surf || photo [avatars/bg's are mine. but the gif header on mobile isn't] || anime || gaming || art/sculpture || ganja || graffiti || insanity ||| pretty unstable but idrgaf ||| pizza || musician || beats || poetry || fashion || science || space || self-love || nsfw || be yourself || om

"we can plant a house, we can build a tree"
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Dreams as of late
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tastefullyoffensive:

Dogs Sitting on Cats [video version]Previously: Dogs Using Computers
tastefullyoffensive:

Dogs Sitting on Cats [video version]Previously: Dogs Using Computers
tastefullyoffensive:

Dogs Sitting on Cats [video version]Previously: Dogs Using Computers
tastefullyoffensive:

Dogs Sitting on Cats [video version]Previously: Dogs Using Computers
tastefullyoffensive:

Dogs Sitting on Cats [video version]Previously: Dogs Using Computers
tastefullyoffensive:

Dogs Sitting on Cats [video version]Previously: Dogs Using Computers
tastefullyoffensive:

Dogs Sitting on Cats [video version]Previously: Dogs Using Computers
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mostlycatsmostly:

(by Zsaj)
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bloodychaos:

Photo taken by me.Please don’t remove the credit.
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huffy-lemon:

Favorite text posts part 4
huffy-lemon:

Favorite text posts part 4
huffy-lemon:

Favorite text posts part 4
huffy-lemon:

Favorite text posts part 4
huffy-lemon:

Favorite text posts part 4
huffy-lemon:

Favorite text posts part 4
huffy-lemon:

Favorite text posts part 4
huffy-lemon:

Favorite text posts part 4
huffy-lemon:

Favorite text posts part 4
huffy-lemon:

Favorite text posts part 4
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evesapples:

http://ss-ugar.tumblr.com/
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"If a man walks in the woods for love of them half of each day, he is in danger of being regarded as a loafer. But if he spends his days as a speculator, shearing off those woods and making the earth bald before her time, he is deemed an industrious and enterprising citizen."
Henry David Thoreau (via occult101)
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Video: Tibetan Healing Sounds
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blackumi:

What in fucks name is this flying water
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afro-dominicano:

Mapping the Light of the Cosmos


  Figuring out what the structure of the universe is surprisingly hard. Most of the matter that makes up the cosmos is totally dark, and much of what is left is in tiny, dim galaxies that are virtually impossible to detect.
  
  Image: The first image above shows one possible scenario for the distribution of light in the cosmos. Credit: Andrew Pontzen/Fabio Governato
  
  This image shows a computer simulation of one possible scenario for the large-scale distribution of light sources in the universe. The details of how light (and hence galaxies and quasars) is distributed through the cosmos is still not a settled question – in particular, the relative contributions of (faint but numerous) galaxies and (bright but rare) quasars is unknown.
  
  (New research from UCL cosmologists published last week shows how we should be able to find out soon.)
  
  However, astronomers know that on the largest scales, the universe is structured as a vast web made up of filaments and clusters of galaxies, gas and dark matter separated by huge, dark voids. Observational astronomy is making strides forward in mapping out these structures in gas and light, but the smallest galaxies – less than a pixel across in the image above – might never be seen directly because they are simply too faint.
  
  A Hubble image of a nearby faint dwarf galaxy (bottom image) shows the challenge involved in observing these objects even when they are in our galaxy’s vicinity.
  
  These computer models are one way of trying to extrapolate from what we know to what is really there. New research from UCL now shows how we can also use future observations of gas to find out more about this elusive population of tiny galaxies.
  
  This simulated image shows the distribution of light in an area of space over 50 million light-years across. The simulation was created by Andrew Pontzen of UCL and Fabio Governato of the University of Washington.
afro-dominicano:

Mapping the Light of the Cosmos


  Figuring out what the structure of the universe is surprisingly hard. Most of the matter that makes up the cosmos is totally dark, and much of what is left is in tiny, dim galaxies that are virtually impossible to detect.
  
  Image: The first image above shows one possible scenario for the distribution of light in the cosmos. Credit: Andrew Pontzen/Fabio Governato
  
  This image shows a computer simulation of one possible scenario for the large-scale distribution of light sources in the universe. The details of how light (and hence galaxies and quasars) is distributed through the cosmos is still not a settled question – in particular, the relative contributions of (faint but numerous) galaxies and (bright but rare) quasars is unknown.
  
  (New research from UCL cosmologists published last week shows how we should be able to find out soon.)
  
  However, astronomers know that on the largest scales, the universe is structured as a vast web made up of filaments and clusters of galaxies, gas and dark matter separated by huge, dark voids. Observational astronomy is making strides forward in mapping out these structures in gas and light, but the smallest galaxies – less than a pixel across in the image above – might never be seen directly because they are simply too faint.
  
  A Hubble image of a nearby faint dwarf galaxy (bottom image) shows the challenge involved in observing these objects even when they are in our galaxy’s vicinity.
  
  These computer models are one way of trying to extrapolate from what we know to what is really there. New research from UCL now shows how we can also use future observations of gas to find out more about this elusive population of tiny galaxies.
  
  This simulated image shows the distribution of light in an area of space over 50 million light-years across. The simulation was created by Andrew Pontzen of UCL and Fabio Governato of the University of Washington.
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afro-dominicano:

First Water Ice Clouds Found Beyond Our Solar System


  For the first time, astronomers have detected water ice clouds, like the ones that shroud Earth, around a dim celestial body outside of our solar system.
  
  Image: Astronomers have detected traces of water ice clouds in the atmosphere of the brown dwarf WISE 0855, a misfit failed star about 7.2 light-years from Earth. The discovery is the first time water ice clouds have been found beyond the solar system, scientists say Credit: Rob Gizis (CUNY BMCC) via Carnegie Institution/YouTube
  
  Scientists discovered evidence of the alien water ice clouds in infrared images of a newly discovered brown dwarf that’s as cold as the North Pole.
  
  "Ice clouds are predicted to be very important in the atmospheres of planets beyond our solar system, but they’ve never been observed outside of it before now," study leader Jacqueline Faherty, who is a fellow at the Carnegie Institution for Science in Washington, D.C., said in a statement.
  
  Ice water has been found around gas giants in our solar system. NASA’s Cassini spacecraft recently detected water ice crystals on Saturn that had been churned up from deep inside the ringed planet’s thick atmosphere during a huge storm. Water ice clouds are also hidden underneath Jupiter’s stormy ammonia ice clouds.
  
  Now, scientists found faint signatures of such clouds around the brown dwarf WISE J085510.83-071442.5, or W0855 for short. The object is the coldest brown dwarf ever observed by scientists. It lurks 7.2 light-years away from Earth and was first seen by NASA’s Wide-Field Infrared Explorer.


I’ve ALWAYS wondered about this exact extreme example of the universe actually, what happens when a small brown dwarf goes so cool that it basically has potential to become a planet??? Here we have a star, if you can call it that, which is literally so cool to the touch that you could touch it!?, 80 degrees? ? Ice cloud atmosphere? Not only could this basically serve the same as a planet but it may cool slower and thus keep am inner heat high enough to possibly last quite a long time in the sort of planet state without need for a star. . And even have life on it lol crazy.
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A strange lonely planet found without a star
An international team of astronomers has discovered an exotic young planet that is not orbiting a star. This free-floating planet, dubbed PSO J318.5-22, is just 80 light-years away from Earth and has a mass only six times that of Jupiter. The planet formed a mere 12 million years ago, a newborn in planet lifetimes.
"We have never before seen an object free-floating in space that that looks like this. It has all the characteristics of young planets found around other stars, but it is drifting out there all alone," explained team leader Dr. Michael Liu of the Institute for Astronomy at the University of Hawaii at Manoa. “I had often wondered if such solitary objects exist, and now we know they do.”The discovery paper of PSO J318.5-22 is being published by Astrophysical Journal Letters and is available at http://arxiv.org/abs/1310.0457. Image: Artist’s conception of PSO J318.5-22. Credit: MPIA/V. Ch. Quetz
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nubbsgalore:

photos by vladim trunov  (more precious lil snail buddies)

Snails eating berries :3 cutes
nubbsgalore:

photos by vladim trunov  (more precious lil snail buddies)

Snails eating berries :3 cutes
nubbsgalore:

photos by vladim trunov  (more precious lil snail buddies)

Snails eating berries :3 cutes
nubbsgalore:

photos by vladim trunov  (more precious lil snail buddies)

Snails eating berries :3 cutes
nubbsgalore:

photos by vladim trunov  (more precious lil snail buddies)

Snails eating berries :3 cutes
nubbsgalore:

photos by vladim trunov  (more precious lil snail buddies)

Snails eating berries :3 cutes
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psychetronictonic:


Bill Hicks, Revelations (1993)

One of the most important comedians of our generation.
psychetronictonic:


Bill Hicks, Revelations (1993)

One of the most important comedians of our generation.
psychetronictonic:


Bill Hicks, Revelations (1993)

One of the most important comedians of our generation.
psychetronictonic:


Bill Hicks, Revelations (1993)

One of the most important comedians of our generation.
psychetronictonic:


Bill Hicks, Revelations (1993)

One of the most important comedians of our generation.
psychetronictonic:


Bill Hicks, Revelations (1993)

One of the most important comedians of our generation.
psychetronictonic:


Bill Hicks, Revelations (1993)

One of the most important comedians of our generation.
psychetronictonic:


Bill Hicks, Revelations (1993)

One of the most important comedians of our generation.
psychetronictonic:


Bill Hicks, Revelations (1993)

One of the most important comedians of our generation.
psychetronictonic:


Bill Hicks, Revelations (1993)

One of the most important comedians of our generation.